Sunday, 20 July 2014

Weekend at Hellifield


So for our weekend away we had planned to go to Settle, there was, according to the Region web site a `temporary holiday site` at the football ground with in walking distance of the town. We got there and found that the dates had been changed and it had finished. We did not want to go back home and luckily Chris remembered a 5 site behind a club in the village of Hellifield. When we got there we had the place to our self`s but it later filled up.


Hellifield Railway Station
There is a great Fish and Chip in Hellifield and this provided a welcome lunch before we set up properly.


Hellifield Railway Station
In the afternoon we had a walk around the village and up to the Railway Station, this was in an amazing conduction. Spotlessly clean light and beautifully kept, and the architecture was just brilliant.


Hellifield Railway Station
I later found out ~
The first railway station at Hellifield was opened by the North Western Railway in 1849.
The current one was built by the Midland Railway and opened on 1 June 1880
By the 1980s it was in a sad condition, but following a £500,000 cash injection from British Rail, The Railway Heritage Trust and English Heritage it was refurbished. In 2003, further structural work by Network Rail was carried out costing another £500,000 to repair/replace the glazing and repaint the canopies on the Grade 2 listed building


Hellifield Railway Station


Hellifield Railway Station


Hellifield Railway Station
In the evening when had a drink in the club, but I didn`t think the beer was not up to much.


Sawley Abbey
Saturday we had a drive though the Ribble Valley to the Lancashire town of Clitheroe. On the way back we stopped at the site of Sawley Abbey.


Sawley Abbey


Sawley Abbey
For evening entertainment we went to the local Hotel The Black Horse, there was a cover band called Total Wrex playing and I must say that they were rather good. The beer there was much better as well


To finish the weekend off we had Sunday lunch at The Black Horse, before heading home. It had been a really great weekend.

Tuesday, 15 July 2014

Kirkstall festival 2014

This festival had been in my diary for a few months, in fact I more or less since last year`s one and of cause I am on the Tia Greyhound Rescue stall. It can be very hectic at times and with the stalls really squashed in, you get 3 metres and that’s it!
Tia at Kirkstall festival 2014 pic from Phil Grimshaw
Apart from my doggie friends and their owners I also met up with a few general friends and even folk I know from the Goth scene including the people from Soho clothes shop in Leeds, who now are the official stockist of The Sophie Lancaster Foundation merchandise. It was good to see the charity been represented here.

Tia at Kirkstall festival 2014 pic from Phil Grimshaw
Of cause there were all the usual shows, stalls, food, music etc. going on all around and I had quick walk around a couple of times but with all the crowds I didn`t many photos.

Tia at Kirkstall festival 2014
Unfortunately we were next to a political party. However they gave us the funniest line of the day, they were bribing people with balloons and food but one of the helpers said to a passer- by “Would you like Fruit Cake?” I had to walk well away with hand over mouth to stop myself from laughing out loud.

Tia at Kirkstall festival 2014
Till next year then.

Friday, 11 July 2014

The Abbey Inn Music and Beer Festival 2014

My friends The Lost Souls invited me to this; they were playing at 5:00. This has been one of the nicest week`s weather wise and so a Beer Festival was just the thing to round off the working week.  
The Lost Souls at The Abbey Inn Beer Festival
It is a long time since I had been in the Newlay district of Leeds. To get there I had to cross both the Leeds ring road and the river Aire so with Friday tea time traffic this had to be done more with good luck than planning in the event the route I chose to take was not too bad and I arrived with plenty of time to say hello to Ade and Patrick, buy some tokens for Beer, and then get some.

The Lost Souls, Ade
I was confronted with a choice of about 50 beers, ciders and other things to drink, I asked the host for help. “A dark mild type please” How strong? “Not too I`m driving” And a lovely pint was poured.

The Lost Souls, Patrick
The Lost Souls took to the stage and were brilliant as always they had a long set and so put in a few covers to appease a different crowd I am sure they have gained new fans.

Choice of about 50 beers at The Abbey Inn Beer Festival
My tokens for 3 pints soon seemed to disappear down my throat and so after about half of the next bands set I decided it would be time to head home rather than drink anymore and drive.

Thursday, 10 July 2014

Tour de France Aftermath

The Tour de France, which started in Yorkshire last week, may be coming just a memory to most now, but today I had my first dealings with the damage it left in its wake. The race went along the A59, just a few hundred yards from my favourite house/ garden
Tour de France Aftermath Lock chain broken on gates
The gate into the adjoining wood where the filter bed for the house`s sewage is had its lock chain broken I guess cars had gone in there as well!

Tour de France Aftermath Grass verges left rutted.
I keep the small lane tidy and cut the grass verges these are sort with the recent wet weather and had been deeply rutted with cars parking on them.

Tour de France Aftermath
People must have needed a toilet and with nothing available they must have decided to go in the woodland.

Tour de France Aftermath Fences broken in several places
Paths had been made from the roadside and the fence has been broken in several places.

Tour de France Aftermath paper plates everywhere
The roadside was scattered with litter and paper plates,

Tour de France Aftermath even a pair of sandals left on the bridge wall!
But the most surprising thing was a pair of sandals left on the bridge wall!

Wednesday, 9 July 2014

All Hallows Church Sutton on the Forest

For the Easter holiday we had a camping (Caravanning) trip to Sutton on the Forest which is just a few a miles north of York.
All Hallows Church Sutton on the Forest
We had a walk into the village and a look around the Church; All Hallows.
All Hallows Church Sutton on the Forest
The Church is more or less opposite Sutton Park stately home. It dates back to (at least) 1185, inside there are monuments to the Harland family.

All Hallows Church Sutton on the Forest

All Hallows Church Sutton on the Forest

Sunday, 22 June 2014

St Peter`s Church Addingham

 
We came here on the same day we had been at Ilkley I remember it was a lovely hot afternoon and I was glad of a bit of shade in the cemetery.
St Peter`s Addingham
Addingham is about 3 miles along the A65 from Ilkley, thankfully now by-passed I post a link to its Wikipedia page ….. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Addingham

General view of St Peter`s Addingham
St Peter`s is an ancient church in the village of Addingham.  Christians have worshipped there for over 1100 years. The building, dating from the 15th century, has a nave roof, arcade and chancel.  The Bell Tower has 6 bells 
 
At St Peter`s Addingham

At St Peter`s Addingham

General view of St Peter`s Addingham

Wednesday, 18 June 2014

Ribblehead Viaduct and St. Leonard’s church at Chapel-le-Dale

Part two from last weekends` trip.
(Most of the following words are from Wikipedia)
The Ribblehead Viaduct
The Ribblehead Viaduct carries the Settle – Carlisle Railway across Batty Moss in the valley of the River Ribble, in North Yorkshire. The viaduct was built by the Midland Railway is a Grade 2 listed structure. The land underneath and around the viaduct, is where the remains of the construction camp and navvy settlements were located is a scheduled monument.

St. Leonard’s church at Chapel-le-Dale
The viaduct was designed by engineer, John Sydney Crossley. The first stone was laid on 12 October 1870 and the last in 1874 One thousand navvies built the viaduct and established shanty towns on the moors for themselves and their families.

St. Leonard’s church at Chapel-le-Dale
There were smallpox epidemics and deaths from industrial accidents. Around one hundred navvies were killed during its construction. There are around 200 burials of men, women, and children in the graveyard at St. Leonard’s church at Chapel-le-Dale dating from the time of its construction. The church has a memorial to the railway workers.

St. Leonard’s church at Chapel-le-Dale
Chapel-le-Dale is much smaller than Settle with only a few houses there now, but is home to St. Leonard’s church

St. Leonard’s church at Chapel-le-Dale
St. Leonard’s church is a grade II listed building, built in the late 17th century with some 18th century additions. According to English Heritage, it was vastly restored in 1869.

The memorial to the railway workers at
St. Leonard’s church at Chapel-le-Dale

St. Leonard’s church at Chapel-le-Dale

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