Thursday, 30 August 2012

Pugin: God's Own Architect

QUICK TURN THE TV ON

Tonight at 9:20 UK  BBC 4

The following has been copied from the Radio Times website.

Radio Times
Review by:
David Butcher

Simply but smartly told, full of interesting ideas – this is typical BBC4. Richard Taylor gives us a brisk profile of the architect who shaped Victorian Britain. Today we look on classical Georgian edifices like the National Gallery as elegant and splendid: young Augustus Pugin saw them as symbols of a godless age, “a national disgrace”, in fact.

What he dreamt of was a return to the style of the Middle Ages, a moral time full of “pointed architecture” – spires and arches and elaborate decoration. So he kick-started the Gothic revival that not only shaped the Palace of Westminster and a host of schools, churches and town halls, but Victorian domestic life, too. Quite an achievement.

About this programme
Richard Taylor explores the enduring legacy of Augustus Welby Northmore Pugin, the 19th-century architect responsible for Big Ben's clocktower and much of the Palace of Westminster. The presenter reveals how, in addition to designing some of Britain's most distinctive landmarks, Pugin also inspired the gothic revival movement and helped establish an architectural style that continues to play a part in defining the UK's national image.

No comments:

Post a Comment

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...